COVID-19: We are open and ship nationwide

Free Discreet Shipping + C.O.D

See details
Sexiconfemale-sexuality the-g-spot

G marks the spot: How to find female sexual pleasure from deep within

Don’t know where to start looking for that elusive sweet spot? We’ll map it out for you right here.

Millions of people search for this exciting treasure. Some are fortunate enough to find it and fulfill their deepest desires; others search their whole lives in vain. Yet many give up and declare that it doesn’t exist.

It’s the woman, the myth, the legend— the G-spot.

What’s the big deal about the G-spot anyway? Does it even exist in the first place? A lot of articles insist that it’s all an elaborate lie, a trendy gimmick that sex magazines use to make money. It’s not hard to see why anyone would be skeptical.

But don’t worry, the erogenous area in your vagina exists... just not in the way that you might expect. All you have to do is embark on this sensational sexcapade, and we’re going to get you there.

A gray area

How do we even begin to define this gray area in the female body? 

Simply put, the G-spot is a sensitive area roughly 1 to 2 inches up your vagina, right up the wall at the side of your belly. Rub it like a genie’s lamp and you might just gush with female ejaculation, much like how men create semen.

That’s vaginal stimulation for you! Sounds straightforward enough, right? Then again, when you dig a little deeper, you’ll realize that the truth is a little more complicated than that.

If you’re curious, the G in G-spot stands for Gräfenberg. That’s Ernst Gräfenberg, the German gynecologist who discovered it along with American obstetrician Robert L. Dickinson in the 1940s. Gräfenberg published his findings in the International Journal of Sexology a decade later, presenting what he called the “urethral sponge” as the key to sexual deficiency among women.

Gräfenberg also reported how some women of his time stimulate their G-spots with “the old fashioned hairpin,” which did not end well. Ouch!

There wasn’t a lot of fanfare until 1982, when sexologists John D. Perry and Beverly Whipple worked on their book entitled The G-Spot and Other Recent Discoveries About Human Sexuality. They compiled many studies, including that of Ernst Gräfenberg, so they named this part the G-spot in his honor.

As an instant bestseller, their work put the G-spot on the map of the female anatomy for the first time. Unfortunately, not everyone was pleased⁠— only some women succeeded in getting that Big O. And because it didn’t always turn out to be the sensitive area people expected, its existence has been disputed ever since.

Many experts wrote off the G-spot as a mere urban myth. Some of its most scathing criticisms came from William H. Masters and Virginia E. Johnson, the research tandem who authored the 1988 edition of Human Sexuality. Here they asserted that only 10% of women got aroused by their G-spots.

But perhaps the biggest blow to the G-spot was delivered by a review in the Journal of Sexual Medicine in 2012. In an analysis of various studies, the authors said didn’t find conclusive evidence of an “anatomically distinct G-spot.”

The sweet spot

However, the review claiming that the G-spot isn’t real actually misses the mark.

According to Perry and Whipple, they never really claimed it was a distinct body part. Rather, the G-spot is a region where the vagina, clitoris, and the urethra meet⁠— hence its other name, the clitourethrovaginal (CUV) complex.

An elaborate network of two other structures cradle the G-spot and make it an immensely pleasurable zone. First, you have the pelvic nerve, which makes your brain light up in delicious ways during your glorious sexcapade.

On the other hand, there’s the paraurethral gland, also known as Skene’s gland, which produces the milky female prostatic fluid. In other words, the female ejaculate that makes squirting possible.

How do you find your way to this hidden treasure? Just feel the ridges 1 to 2 inches up your vagina when you’re aroused to know you’re in the right place. Then make a “come hither” motion to stroke that area, so you can put your finger (or fingers) on it soon enough.

Applying pressure on your G-spot can increase your pain threshold by 47%, and this figure could even be a whopping 107% at the point of orgasm.

You might feel the need to pee once you start stimulating your G-spot, but that’s totally normal. The Big O is just around the bend!

Giving it a G-shot

Still feeling a little lost on your way to your G-spot? Beverly Hills plastic surgeons David Matlock and Alexander Simopoulos suggest a quick fix for that: the G-shot

This procedure supposedly amplifies your G-spot through fillers, essentially making that part of your vagina more prominent and pleasurable. That is, if you have a few minutes and a few thousand dollars to spare every four months.

But does it really work? Bat Sheva Marcus, the Clinical Director of The Medical Center For Female Sexuality, doubts it does. She says it’s not some miracle worker that women can bank on: “For women who don't normally get pleasure from that area, they won't feel much of an effect.”

Not to mention, injecting foreign substances up your vagina can also cause complications in the future. So while it’s worked wonders for some women, it’s more advisable not to go through such extremes to stimulate your G-spot.

The best route to an earth-shattering vaginal orgasm remains to be accepting your G-spot the way it is. So what else do you gain from learning more about it?

  • Educating yourself about the G-spot encourages you to explore your own body freely and discover what feels pleasurable for you.
  • It reminds us that sexual intercourse can feel good not only for men but also for women like you, so long as your partner knows how to push the right buttons.
  • You’ll have plenty of opportunities to enrich your relationship and make it last longer as you keep your sex life exciting and dynamic. (Wink wink!)

Hitting the mark

Should every woman seek satisfaction from their G-spot alone? Not really.

One study shows that only about 1 of 5 women can rely on vaginal stimulation alone, while more than 1/3 of women need some clit lovin’. The others say that they feel best when both parties are involved, so it’s best to think of your G-spot as a potentially lovely addition to your sexcapade.

With that in mind, how can you get more bang for your G-spot? Here are some ideas for you to get into the zone easily:

  • Go solo. Before anything else, explore your own body through solo play. Get comfortable with massaging your vulva at your own pace to make it saucy!
  • Finger it out. Insert your finger (or fingers) into your vagina— slowly but surely does the trick! Make sure that your vagina is well-lubricated; a drizzle of lube will never hurt.
  • Play with toys. Some sex toys such as curved dildos and G-spot vibrators are specially made for that sweet spot up your vag. Why not play around with these options?
  • Strike a pose. When it’s time to hit it off with your partner, some positions work better to bring the penis or strap-on dildo closer to your G-spot. We recommend spooning, being the woman on top, or going doggy-style.
  • Mix it up. Why choose between clitoral and vaginal stimulation when you can have the best of both worlds? Enjoy the blended orgasm by fondling your clit during intercourse or playing with a rabbit vibe.

Whatever you do, don’t stress too much over getting a vaginal orgasm. Setting your sights on sex as a duty or chore is the best way to kill your buzz, after all. 

That’s because, at the end of the day, there’s no “right” way to orgasm apart from what gives you the happiest, safest, and most satisfying sex life— whether that includes your G-spot or not.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is the G-spot?

The G-spot is a sensitive area where your vagina, clitoris, and urethra all come together. That’s also where you discover your paraurethral gland, your own version of the prostate gland. Rub it like a genie’s lamp and you might just gush with female ejaculation, much like how men create semen. That’s vaginal stimulation for you!

Where do I find my G-spot?

It’s roughly 1 to 2 inches up your vagina, right up the wall at the side of your belly. Feel the ridges to know you’re in the right place. Then make a “come hither” motion to stroke that area, and you’ll be able to put your finger (or fingers) on it soon enough. 

Does the G-spot really exist?

The G-spot isn’t one distinct body part, if that’s what you’re asking. It’s made up of various tissue and nerves all intersecting in that area, which is why scientists also call it the clitourethrovaginal (CUV) complex. Some women can feel immense pleasure from being touched right there, but it’s not for everyone.

Is there really such a thing as a female ejaculate?

Yes. Female ejaculate is fluid produced by the paraurethral gland. (No, it’s not urine.) It’s about a teaspoonful of milky or watery fluid that women secrete during arousal or orgasm, usually when the G-spot is stimulated. But not all women ejaculate— you’re perfectly normal either way.

Do all women achieve orgasm through their G-spot?

Not really. One study shows that only about 1 of 5 women can rely on vaginal stimulation alone, while more than 1/3 of women need some clit lovin’. The others say that they feel best when both parties are involved, so it’s best to think of your G-spot as a potentially lovely addition to your sexcapade.

Can my G-spot get stimulated during intercourse?

Yes, and some positions work better to bring the penis or strap-on dildo closer to your G-spot. Try being the little spoon or lying down on your stomach, doggy-style, while your partner enters from behind. And if you want more control over the depth and speed of each thrust, there’s always the woman-on-top variation.

Does a G-spot orgasm feel better than a clitoral orgasm?

Many women claim that clitoral orgasms feel more intense and pinpointed, while G-spot orgasms ripple throughout the whole body for longer periods. They may be different in some ways, but they’re orgasms all the same— one isn’t better than the other. Just explore your own body and go with what feels most pleasurable for you

What types of sex toys will stimulate my G-spot best?

Curved dildos are designed to hit your sensitive area at just the right spot, but they’re not your only option. There are also G-spot vibrators that come in handy when you can’t reach or stimulate it yourself. Plus, you can always get rabbit vibrators for blended (internal and external) orgasms.

Will a condom get in the way of my G-spot orgasm?

Women are just as likely to achieve orgasm with or without a condom. Sex can even feel better when your partner wears one since you can take your sweet time— no need for him to hurry and pull out. Not to mention, condoms are 98% effective when used correctly!

What’s a G-shot, and do I need it to enjoy G-spot orgasms?

The G-spot augmentation, more known as the G-shot, injects the vagina with collagen or other fillers to enlarge the G-spot. It claims to make intercourse more pleasurable for women, but in reality, this procedure is no silver bullet. It’s not proven to make you enjoy vaginal stimulation, especially if you’re not feeling it.

Posted by Prism Kristensen

Get your sex toy in 3 easy steps

Step 1

STEP 1

Navigate to SHOP NOTI and select your preferred sex toy

Step 2

STEP 2

Add the item to the cart and proceed to checkout

Step 3

STEP 3

Feel confident and experience guilt-free orgasms

Most Popular